Late July / Early August UPDATE – The Window of Time for Fall Grass Seed Planting Will Be Here and Gone Before You Know It!

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Every year around this time, it always feels like SUMMER is FLYING by.  

We’ve been getting lots of questions about Grass Seed, which we DO SELL in addition to our 100% Kentucky Blue Grass sod and our Rhizomatous Tall Fescue Sod, and many other lawn care products (including fertilizer).

Red Hen Turf Farm - Grass Seed

IDEAL TIMES TO PLANT GRASS SEED

Did you know that there are certain times of the year that are better to plant grass seed than others?  If not, you’re not alone.

It turns out that in our part of the country, often the BEST TIME to plant Cool Season Grass Seed is in the LATE SUMMER / EARLY FALL.

Specifically, in the northern-third Indiana, August 15th through September 15th is the ideal time period to plant Cool Season Grasses.  (One exception to this rule would be if you have a heavy shaded area due to trees, in which case you might want to consider a winter or spring seeding when the leaves have fallen and more sunlight can reach your soil bed.)

Why plant grass seed between August and September 15th?   Well, according to Purdue turf expert, Zac Reicher, planting turf grass seed in northern Indiana within this late-summer / August 15th – September 15th window offers several advantages:

  • Air and soil temperatures are more moderate, which improves seed GERMINATION.
  • It typically rains more frequently, which helps reduce (but may not eliminate) extra watering … this also improves your chances for successful seed GERMINATION.
  • Grass seedlings face fewer pests than they do in the spring or the hottest parts of summer, again improving GERMINATION.

WHAT IS GERMINATION

A FEW TIPS TO IMPROVE YOUR ODDS FOR BETTER SEEDING RESULTS

First, let’s talk about what method of seeding or over-seeding you might consider.  Many people try to simply cast the seed by hand or by using a spreader and leave it at that.  But is this the most efficient way?  The answer is NO for several reasons, including the fact that rain or wind will likely carry much of this seed away and it will never grow.  Or much of it will become a yummy meal for wildlife.  Also, without giving the seed a thin layer of soil over the top to grow in, there’s a good chance your rate of success will go way down.  You can rent a slit seeder or a core aerator at most local garden centers.

We recommend using either a slit-seeder to plant your seed, or using a core aerator first and then seeding into the cores.  These methods protect the seed from being carried away, and provide the much needed soil bed for the seed to germinate.

Let’s go a little deeper…

New grass seedlings have poorly developed root systems, which means they cannot effectively absorb nutrients from the soil.

For this reason, it is important to WATER and FERTILIZE PROPERLY after seeding to encourage germination and establishment.  

  • Fertilizer Application #1 – Do this right after planting your grass seed.   We recommend using 12-12-12 (or another starter fertilizer).  The rate of application will depend on the species of grass you are planting.  You should also water 2-3 Times each day while the seeds are in the process of germinating.  Apply enough water to keep the soil moistened. When you see the new grass plants (seedlings), you may reduce the number of times you water.
  • Fertilizer Application #2 –  4-6 weeks after planting (depending on the type of grass seed you’ve planted).  Use some more of the starter fertilizer that you applied in the first application.  Again, the rate of application will depend on what kind of grass you’ve planted.  Continue to water as needed to prevent the soil from drying out. However, be careful that you do not keep the soil saturated, leaving your new grass vulnerable to pests and diseases.
  • Fertilizer Application #3 – Do this 4-5 Weeks after your 2nd Application (once again depending on the type of grass seed you’ve planted). Our 25-0-10 fertilizer would be perfect for this 3rd Application. Or, for the 3rd Application, you could apply a broad leaf herbicide if needed to control broadleaf weeds (such as our 22-0-5+Trimec+Iron). On the other hand, if you’re dealing with grassy weeds, they are difficult to kill with herbicides, so proper mowing is your best choice for controlling them.

FOR MORE DETAILS BEYOND WHAT WE INCLUDE BELOW, ALONG WITH OUR 2019 PRICING INFORMATION and APPLICATION RATES, CLICK HERE

PURCHASING GRASS SEED AT RED HEN TURF FARM

Here at Red Hen Turf Farm, we sell several varieties of grass seed by the pound, which is handy whether you have a very small or very large area to plant.  Contact us for prices and recommendations based on your specific needs and goals.  Some of your choices include:

100% Kentucky Bluegrass Seed … 

This sod-quality seed will match our most current variety of Kentucky Bluegrass sod in production. Seed can be used to patch small areas in existing sod or seeding a large area next to sod. This seed takes 21 days to germinate and will be very slow to fill in. This seed will require some extra attention to establish, but it exhibits the same deep green color and disease resistance that Red Hen’s sod does.  AVAILABLE IN 50 LB BAGS, OR IN BULK BY THE POUND.

Rhizomatous Tall Fescue (RTF) Seed … 

This seed will match our No Net Rhizomatous Tall Fescue sod in production. Again, like with our 100% Kentucky Bluegrass, sod-quality seed, the RTF seed can be used to patch small areas in existing sod or seeding a large area next to sod. This seed takes 7-14 days to germinate.  AVAILABLE IN 50 LB BAGS, OR IN BULK BY THE POUND.

Greenskeeper Custom Mix Seed … 

OUR MOST POPULAR SEED!  Works well in full sun and light amounts of shade.  This variety contains 3 types of grass seeds and each type will germinate at a different time. AVAILABLE IN 50 LB BAGS, OR IN BULK BY THE POUND.

Greenskeeper Premium Shade Mix Seed …

While no grass loves shade, this blend has varieties that exhibit better growth habits in partially shaded areas. For more information, visit the “Grass In Shade” section of our website. AVAILABLE IN 50 LB BAGS, OR IN BULK BY THE POUND.

Greenskeeper Super Shady Seed …

NEW IN 2018!  If you have less than 2 hours of direct sunlight and have tried to other shady mixes with little luck, this may be the grass seed for you!  This mix contains includes 5% Poa Supina bluegrass seed – some of the highest tech shad grass seed on the market.  AVAILABLE IN 25 LB BAGS, OR IN BULK BY THE POUND.

Greenskeeper Valu Plus Mix

An affordable option, good for rapid establishment.  Primarily consists of ryegrasses, with some Kentucky Bluegrass and Creeping Red Fescue.  AVAILABLE IN 50 LB BAGS

Greenskeeper Low-Mow National Links Mix

Consists of low-growing fine fescues well adapted to the harsh conditions of golf course roughs and bunker faces. Left unmown, this formula provides maintenance savings, erosion control, and adaptation under varying soil conditions.AVAILABLE IN 50 LB BAGS ONLY

P-105 Princeton Kentucky Bluegrass

A compact-type variety.  Excellent durability for meticulous sports fields, landscape professionals, golf course fairways, tees and roughs.  Best traffic tolerance among commercial Kentucky Bluegrass. Adapts to wide range of soils and climatic conditions. AVAILABLE IN 50 LB BAGS ONLY

What’s more, if you don’t see what you are after, we may be able to special order the seed you need. Just let us know the seed specifications you have and we will do what we can to get it for you for a reasonable cost.

READY TO TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE ABOUT SEEDING?  TAKE OUR QUIZ by CLICKING HERE

LEARN MORE

  • Contact Red Hen Turf Farm … Whether you’re a recent customer, a customer from years or even decades ago, or you’re simply looking for information or pricing, we’re here to help.  What’s more, regardless of whether you end up purchasing anything from us, we genuinely enjoy talking with and educating people.  Give us a call (574-232-6811) or drop us an email (turf@redhenturf.com).
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What is “proper lawn watering” anyhow? THE SUPER HOT SUMMER EDITION

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When the Temperatures are HIGH, RED HEN TURF FARM RECOMMENDS that you hold off on fertilizing and mowing, and plan on doing some extra watering if you want to keep your lawn from going dormant, especially with Recently Laid Sod

All year, we receive lots of calls about how to water your lawn correctly.

Even if you’re fortunate enough to have a sprinkler system, unfortunately, it’s not a “set it and forget it” thing.

Need more information on PROPER WATERING TECHNIQUES in various conditions?

Check out the LINKS below for several Science-Based / Regionally-Applicable resources to help guide you.

  • Purdue’s Irrigation Practices for Home Lawns GUIDE – A great resource for general information on WATERING PROPERLY – CLICK HERE 
  • Purdue’s 2012 Article, “My Lawn is Brown and Crunchy… Is it Dead? What do I do now?” …  While now in early July 2018 we’re not officially in a drought necessarily, the information relates to high summer temps and the need to adjust irrigation accordingly – CLICK HERE
  • Michigan State University’s Article, “Helping your turf during dry and hot weather”CLICK HERE
  • Red Hen Turf Farm’s Early and Long-term Sod Care Guide – CLICK HERE
    • This is our official GENERAL GUIDE on caring for your new sod, now, and in the long term.  If you’re wondering about any of the topics covered and need more information, feel free to call at 574-232-6811, but perhaps first check out Purdue’s extensive list of easy to follow guides for homeowner lawn care at THIS LINK
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GRUBS! and Caution While Googling – 2 CURRENT HOT TOPICS at Red Hen Turf Farm

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When it comes to caring for your lawn, can we please use science and not what you found on Google or happen to see on a store shelf?

Now please do not get me wrong — I really like and use Google a lot. But you must consider where the info is coming from. Ask yourself: “Are they trying to sell me something or get some type of info from me?”

When it comes to lawn grass there actually is a lot of great info out there on the web. The problem is there is more bad than good.

There are four science-based, regionally-relevant sources I would recommend sticking to:

  1. Purdue University Extension – www.turf.purdue.edu/homeowner.html
  2. Michigan State University Extension – www.canr.msu.edu/home_lawns/index
  3. Ohio State University Extension www.ohioline.osu.edu/findafactsheet  … and of course
  4. Red Hen Turf Farm’s website www.redhenturf.com and blog www.redhenturf.com/blog

We get our info from the first three sources.

With that out of my system, let us talk about one of this year’s number one questions asked:  What do I do about Grubs?

First, let’s talk about whether you NEED to apply any products in the first place. Almost every yard has grubs.  Most grubs do very little harm. However, most expert entomologists believe that until you reach 5-10 grub larvae per square foot, there are not enough of them in one location to do damage to your lawn, and until you are seeing 5-10 grubs per square foot, there likely is no need to even consider using chemical insecticides to kill them.  But, let’s assume you are concerned you have enough grubs to do some damage.

When it comes to choosing a product to apply, it may seem there is an endless number of choices that are for sale. I really believe many homeowners waste way too much money and time applying the wrong product. Basically, there are two main factors to look at when it comes to choosing a product to kill grubs: (1)  the time of the year you are applying it, and (2) what type of grub you want killed.

(By the way — Yes! There are different beetles that include a grub / larvae stage of their life cycles, and No! grubs are not a main food source for moles … Read more HERE.)

White Grubs Adult Beetles, IMAGE SOURCE: Ohio State University Extension's Article, "Identification of White Grubs in Turfgrass"

IMAGE SOURCE: Ohio State University Extension’s Article, “Identification of White Grubs in Turfgrass”

Let’s focus on the time of year that it currently is — early July 2018.

If you put down a product that includes Merit or Dylox (Red Hen carries both), water it into the soil and follow other label directions for control of many types of grubs. You notice I said “many”.

There is a product on the market that is called Milky Spore. Now, Milky Spore is a great product, but only for Japanese’s beetle larvae. There are 7 types of annual and multi-annual white grubs that are common in the Midwest. If you believe the only beetle to lay eggs in your yard is going to be the Japanese’s beetle, then go and buy it. But not from Red Hen. My job is to save people time and money, and Milky Spore goes against both of those values.

There are more great products out there that can be applied this time of year. But we all need to read the label to save time and money. Let’s use science this year, and always consider whether the source of your information is reliable.

Until next time, Jeremy

* * * * * * * * * *

Want to Dive Deeper into the Subject of Grubs?  

  • Red Hen’s previous blog posts that include info on Grubs – CLICK HERE
  • Purdue University Extension’s article, “Managing White Grubs in Turfgrass” – CLICK HERE
  • Michigan State University Extension’s article, “What are the alternatives to grub control insecticides?” – CLICK HERE
  • Michigan State University Extension’s article, “How to choose and when to apply grub control products for your lawn” — CLICK HERE
  • Ohio State University Extensions article, “Identification of White Grubs in Turfgrass” — CLICK HERE

 

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