Straight from the RED HEN FAQ VAULT – If it’s BROWN, Mow it DOWN … and More EARLY SPRING GRASS TIPS

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Red Hen's 1st 2018 Harvested Pallet of Kentucky Bluegrass Sod - WINTER IS HOLDING ON STRONG!

Red Hen’s 1st 2018 Harvested Pallet of Kentucky Bluegrass Sod – WINTER IS HOLDING ON STRONG! Harvested 4/9/18

You’ve noticed that in the winter months, your lawn’s grass typically will turn brown, right?  This is a normal response to winter conditions — your grass has simply gone into a dormant or resting stage.  Though your grass may look dead, it is alive and is waiting for the air and soil temperatures to rise in late March to early April.  Once this happens, the turf color will begin to green up and start growing again.

So what can you do besides wait for warmer days?

Well, if your grass tips are brown, go ahead and mow them down.  That’s right … By doing an early spring mowing and removing the brown tips off of your grass, this naturally brings out the greener grass blades, and it may even help to stimulate growth. While you’ll still need to plan on simply giving the grass more (WARMER) TIME to green up, a good mowing certainly won’t hurt, at any rate.  For an established lawn, remember to mow grass to 3 to 3.5 inches high, which makes it less prone to insect, disease, and weed problems.  In general, you should mow frequently, cutting off no more than a third of the height each time.   Also, by mowing frequently and only when grass is dry, this will prevent clumping, and allow for leaving the clippings on your lawn. Save yourself time and money by NOT bagging or raking up your clippings.  The grass clippings will break down and return valuable nutrients to the soil — in a way, it’s Mother Nature’s Free Fertilizer … However, if you do end up with clumps of grass clippings, you will want to rake, bag, or mow again so they don’t smother / shade the grass.

What else can you do?

An early spring application of fertilizer may do wonders in speeding up the green-up of your lawn.  As I write this on April 12, 2018, the ground is no longer frozen, so it’s a fine time to start off with either a Fertilizer + Crabgrass Pre-emergent (like our 13-0-5). By around May 1st depending on when we start seeing consistent 60+ degree days, you may decide to treat for broadleaf weeds with a Fertilizer + Broadleaf Post-Emergent like our 22-0-5.

TIP:  Remember, if you’re planning on doing some Spring Grass Seeding, as a general rule you will want to keep any herbicides away from those areas.

Not sure what approach to take?  Every year is different, and every yard is different… Give us a call and we can chat about different options.

Understandably, every spring, we get a dozen or so calls from customers who sodded their lawns last year with Red Hen’s 100% Kentucky Bluegrass Sod, because they are worried about how UNGREEN their lawns are while their neighbors’ (non-Kentucky-Bluegrass) lawns are already coming out of dormancy and greening up.

Compared to the perennial ryegrasses and fescue grasses that are typical in our area, Kentucky bluegrass sod needs MORE time, MORE warmth, MORE sunlight, and MORE nutrients to GREEN-UP in the spring. This is simply a natural result of the genetics of the Kentucky bluegrass sod.

On the other hand, the superior genetics of Red Hen’s Kentucky Bluegrass sod gives it excellent disease tolerance against problems like leaf spot and summer patch.  Kentucky Bluegrass is by far (in our opinion) the most beautiful cool-season grass you can buy. Once your Kentucky Bluegrass fully greens up by mid to late May, its deep, emerald blue-green color and dense, low-growing boat shaped blades can’t be beat.

More questions? Give us a call at 574-232-6811 … Thanks from Michelle, Lisa, and Jeremy @ Red Hen Turf Farm

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PREFER TO LEARN AT YOUR OWN PACE? Purdue University Extension’s Turfgrass Program offers so much free information about homeowners’ lawn care.  This is a fantastic science-based and regionally-focused resource you can feel confident about trusting.  You can explore at https://turf.purdue.edu/homeowner.html  … Here’s a small sampling of the MANY topics covered:

Establishing a Turf Area
Establishing Lawn Areas From Seed
Seeding a Turf Area in the Spring
Purchasing Quality Grass Seed for Your Lawn
Establishing a Lawn from Sod
Building a Backyard Putting Green

Maintaining a Home Lawn
Don’t Bag It
Irrigation Practices for Homelawns
Mowing, Thatching, Aerifying, and Rolling Turf
Fertilizing Established Lawns
Should I Hire a Professional Lawn Care Service?
Maintenance Calendar for Indiana Lawns
Maintaining Lawns on Sandy Soils
Animal Urine Damage in Turf

Weed Control
Control of Broadleaf Weeds in Homelawns
Control of Crabgrass in Homelawns
Identification and Control of Perennial Grassy Weeds

Disease Control
Turfgrass Disease Profiles: Gray Snow Mold
Turfgrass Disease Profiles: Pink Snow Mold
Turfgrass Disease Profiles: Brown Patch

Insect Control
Turf Insect Management
Japanese Beetles in the Urban Landscape
New White Grub Pests of Indiana
Protecting Pollinators from Insecticide Applications in Turfgrass
Moles

Pesticide Information
The Way to Spray
Pesticides and the Home, Lawn, and Garden
The Benefits of Pesticides: A Story Worth Telling

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Red Hen’s 2 Choices for an INSTANT LAWN: Kentucky Bluegrass Sod vs. Rhizomatous Tall Fescue Sod

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Red Hen’s Kentucky Bluegrass

Did you know that Red Hen Turf Farm produces and sells 2 kinds of sod? 

In 2018, we carry both our flagship 100% Kentucky Bluegrass Sod, and more recently our Rhizomatous Tall Fescue Sod (also referred to as “RTF Sod” or simply “Tall Fescue Sod”).

 

Of these 2 choices, our Kentucky Bluegrass Sod is a more popular cool-season turf grass that is specific to our Midwest region.

By far, the majority of sod we sell is our Kentucky Bluegrass Sod. 

So what are the main differences between Red Hen’s two types of Sod, and why might you choose one over the other?  We get this question a lot.

Let’s start by focusing on KENTUCKY BLUEGRASS SOD …

Kentucky Bluegrass is by far (in our opinion) the more beautiful of the two turf grasses.  It has a deep, emerald blue-green color with boat shaped blades and spreads quickly via rhizomes, (which are basically underground roots) to form a dense “knitted” type sod.

Kentucky Bluegrass does best in full sun but needs at least 4 hours or more of DIRECT sunlight per day to thrive. Kentucky bluegrass requires regular maintenance.  Routine fertilization is key to maintaining this beautiful, lush turf.

Kentucky Bluegrass has a shallower rooting system than Tall Fescue Sod.  Because of its shallow rooting system, Kentucky Bluegrass has lower tolerances for heat and drought.  This is why it is important to follow good watering habits, especially in the heat of the summer.

Every spring, we have a handful of our new Kentucky Bluegrass sod customers call us early in the spring and ask us why their sod is still brown when their neighbors’ lawns are already greening up.  Kentucky Bluegrass takes a few extra weeks to “green up” than fescues and rye grasses. This is absolutely normal for this type of grass, so it’s nothing to worry about.  You can read more about this issue in our previous blog post,Straight from our FAQ VAULT … It’s Spring, but why is my Kentucky Bluegrass Sod not GREEN yet?”

One of the best things about Kentucky bluegrass is, once it’s established – it has the ability to repair, spread and recuperate quickly from damages.

IN SUMMARY:  Kentucky Bluegrass Sod Maintenance Level Medium to High Follow watering instructions, mow “right”, and fertilize regularly for best results. To keep pests and diseases at a minimum, promote a thick, dense turf by regularly fertilizing.


Now, let’s switch over to focusing on TALL FESCUE SOD …

At this point, Red Hen’s Rhizomatous Tall Fescue Sod is grown in limited quantities, and for this reason, we require a minimum of 2,000 sq. ft. order and a 2-3 day lead time for pickup or delivery.

Red Hen’s Rhizomatous Tall Fescue Sod is slightly lighter in green color compared to Kentucky bluegrass.  It is a deep-rooted, cool-season turf grass that adapts well to a wide variety of soil types.  The deep root system allows Tall Fescue to tolerate drought conditions better than Kentucky bluegrass.

Many of our customers ask if we have “shade grass.”  Our response is, “no grass likes shade.” However, our tall fescue is a great heat and drought tolerant grass that tends to do well in less irrigated areas.

Typically, tall fescue grasses have a “bunch-style” growth habit without the ability to spread like Kentucky bluegrass’s rhizomatous root system.  However, with the advent of this past decade’s turf technology, Rhizomatous Tall Fescue is the only tall fescue variety with true rhizomes, which help its roots knit together, repair and spread better than regular fescue.  This helps with installation and makes for quick establishment.  Re-seeding is still necessary in damaged areas, as the turf can tend to be “clumpy” versus the tightly knit Kentucky bluegrass.

Red Hen’s Tall Fescue (in the fall season)

Since less water is needed for Tall Fescue, it is a common choice for those who do not have access to irrigation and desire a lower maintenance lawn.

IN SUMMARY:  Rhizomautous Tall Fescue Sod Maintenance Level:  Low-Moderate: Less irrigation and less fertilizer is needed – once established.  Avoid fertilizing in the late spring and summer (warmer) months.

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Ready to Learn More?  Looking for a Quote? Call us at 574-232-6811 or visit us our PDF library.

Or, as always, Purdue offers a wide range of free educational, research-based articles about home lawn care in our part of the country – HERE’s THE LINK

Did you enjoy this article?  You can SIGN UP FOR RED HEN’s EMAIL NEWSLETTERS HERE  to have these types of articles sent directly to your Email Inbox

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Crabgrass Countdown!

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We’re starting to get calls with questions on when to apply crabgrass pre-emergent (preventer).

This is what we’re telling our customers:

So we never have an “exact” date on when to apply the crabgrass pre-emergent since every season is different. We monitor the weather and soil temperatures.  Crabgrass germinates when the soil temperatures are consistently 60° F degrees for 3-5 days at a 1/4″ level. Remember, crabgrass pre-emergent must be applied at least 2 weeks prior to germination for it to be effective. April 1st looks like a good target date right now but that may change depending on weather conditions.  Here’s a great (real time) link for crabgrass germination and optimum times to apply pre-emergent from Michigan State University:  GDD Tracker

As we know, the best crabgrass prevention is a dense, healthy turf, but because crabgrass has a massive reproductive & survival capability, it is common to have some  in your lawn.

Here are some helpful tips to prevent crabgrass: Apply a pre-emergent 2 weeks prior to crabgrass germination. Regular fertilization should help thicken turf along with proper watering and mowing.  Water deeply and infrequently. (Light and shallow watering will encourage crabgrass growth).  Do not mow more than 1/3 of the leaf blade at one time.  If you mow below 2.5-3 inches (depending on the turf species) it will increase crabgrass populations. 

IMPORTANT TO KNOW:  If you are planning on seeding or have completed a dormant winter seeding, do not use crabgrass pre-emergent.  It will likely end up killing any new grass seedling growth. There are a few options for crabgrass treatment if you have planted grass seed or plan on planting this spring.  Just give us a call and we can go over the products to use. Use caution when using post emergent herbicides and ALWAYS read the label. 574-232-6811 is the number to call.

Pick your battles.  You can’t plant grass seed AND apply crabgrass pre-emergent at the same time. If crabgrass was a problem for you last year and you want to treat it, apply the crabgrass pre-emergent and save your seeding for fall.  That is the best time to seed anyway.  (Typically around August 15-September 15 … again, every year is a bit different … Purdue explains more about seeding in their free publication – CLICK HERE).

Here’s more info from Purdue Science: Crabgrass Control

Know when to give up. If you wait until summer and you realize your crabgrass is out of control, you may as well let it go until it dies off with the first frost.   There are post emergent herbicides that you can use but they are more difficult to use than the pre-emergence products, they cannot be used in the heat of the summer, are expensive,  and are only effective on smaller crabgrass plants – which you probably don’t see anyway.

If you are looking for crabgrass pre-emergent + fertilizer, come see us!  We have quality fertilizer in stock at great prices AND you get expert advice (the advice is free) if needed!

The weather is getting warmer so why not take a leisurely drive out to New Carlisle to  pick up your sod, seed, herbicides and fertilizer.  Also, don’t forget to visit us on Facebook to see all of our updates including office hours and our first harvest of the season!

We have a ton of crabgrass topics!  Check out our previous blog posts that touch on the topic of CRABGRASS by CLICKING HERE.

Until next time!

The Red Hen Crew

 

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DISCONTINUED – Red Hen Jumbo Bags of Mulch and Top Soil

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5/02/17 UPDATE:  Red Hen Turf Farm has decided, effective 2017, to DISCONTINUE our JUMBO BAGS of Mulch and Top Soil.  We no longer carry these items, in bag or bulk.  If you need a referral, we recommend contacting your favorite local garden centers.  

A SINCERE THANK YOU TO ALL WHO HAVE PURCHASED OUR JUMBO BAGS OVER THE PAST SEVERAL YEARS!  

We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause you.  

It was a hard call, but ultimately, we felt that the Jumbo Bags were detracting from where our FOCUS needs to be, which is the production and harvest of Red Hen’s Turfgrass Sod.   CALL for a QUOTE TODAY: 574-232-6811

 

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Red Hen 2017 WEED ALERT – The Crabgrass is Coming! The Crabgrass is Coming!

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CRABGRASS
Image Source: Purdue Turf Tips

Just a quick reminder….

It is once again time to get your crabgrass preventer out on the lawn.  That is, unless you’re planning on a spring seeding … then you would NOT want to apply any type of weed herbicide.

Our 13-0-5 with crabgrass preventer (the Grey Bag) is a great choice, especially at only $29.50 plus tax.  It covers 12,500 Square Foot, at a rate of 4 pounds per 1000 Square Foot.Photo of Red Hen - Fertilizer and Tools_03-11-16

I was down south in Alabama last week looking for signs of crabgrass, but the house we rent every year was all weeds.

Jeremy's vacation view in Alabama

Jeremy’s vacation view in Alabama

From the websites I use to track turf-related problems across the nation we are starting to see it germinate in parts of Kentucky and Tennessee.  It’s a matter of 1-2 weeks and we’ll start seeing this common weed migrating to the north.

Getting your preventer down now will help stop crabgrass from germinating and kill other weeds also. With last year’s 5 weeks of little to no rain I think it might be a good idea to apply a crabgrass preventer twice this year to stay away from the summer flush of crabgrass. HOWEVER, that said, the only way I would recommend to do 2 applications is if you have open turf and have had problems in the past.

Do remember that its need to be watered in and applied at the right rate to be effective. Please always read the label.

Want to learn more about keeping crabgrass under control?  Check out our previous blog posts on this topic by CLICKING HERE.

Until next time!

Jeremy and the Red Hen Crew

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It JUST SNOWED, right? Well, the Crabgrass is Coming!

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Well we are looking to have an early spring this year. It sure has been nice sitting outside with the neighbors, getting my boat ready and even washing my truck. We even harvest our first semi of sod on Friday. I know last year I was not doing this to much later.
When the phone starts to ring and customers start coming into the Shop, it’s time to look at timing of CRABGRASS.

If you have been in the Michiana area for a while you know we have had an early season like this not too long ago. But it is usually hard to remember how your yard looked by the end of the year.

The last early spring we had some home lawns had breakthrough of crabgrass. We call it the summer flush. This could be the year to apply a CRABGRASS PRE-EMERGENCE (aka a “Weed and Feed”) two times.

But remember not every yard is the same and neither is the weather from year to year.

Looking at the long-term Growing Degree Days (GDD), I would say that the next 3 weeks would be a great time to apply Crabgrass pre-emergence.  

Photo of Red Hen - Fertilizer and Tools_03-11-16

Our 50 pound bag of 13-0-5 w/.28% Barricade herbicide (the GREY BAG, front row, farthest to the left) is a GREAT CRABGRASS PRE-EMERGENT  that INCLUDES FERTILIZER.  It’s only $29.50 and would cover 12,500 square feet when applying at 4 pounds per 1000 square feet.  CLICK ON THE PHOTO to be taken to a LINK with the technical specs on our 13-0-5 for crabgrass management.

After your first application is done, perhaps you’ll find that your yard is just not thick enough. A second crabgrass pre-emergent application 60 days later can be beneficial. I do believe the last time I recommended this to all was in March 2013.

Some key points to remember going into this season:

  1. It rained a lot last year in the spring. This year could be different.
  2. Pre-emergent herbicides must be watered in to be effective.
  3. Always follow the label on fertilizer, and don’t forget that the labels can change from time to time.
  4. Ensure even distribution of product especially where you are most likely to see crabgrass.
  5. Thin turf is often a problem in compacted area such as just off a driveway or sidewalk, in non-irrigated areas, and with low-cut turf
  6. Crabgrass can start to germinate when the average daily soil reaches 57° to 64° F.  A Crabgrass Pre-Emergent is most effective when you apply it BEFORE the weed starts to germinate.  We are at 49° F as of 3-9-2016 at the farm.

Come on out and visit us soon!  Our current hours are Monday – Friday, 8AM to 4PM Eastern time.

And – as always – we’re here for questions – 574-232-6811.

Lastly, as a BONUS, you can read some articles from our archives that address CRABGRASS by CLICKING HERE.

Until Next Time,

Jeremy and the Red Hen Team

first cutting 2016_collage with new trebro and gordon_fb 3-11-16

 

 

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Crabgrass and What’s Up with Other Weeds in Your Lawn

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Snow at Red Hen 4-22-15 collage
So what is up with this weather?  This morning’s lake effect snow showers at the end of April was a surprise. I am just glad our employees were ready and more importantly dressed for it.

So what did this weather do to us in the Michiana area in terms of lawn care?

Well we still have time to get our Fertilizer PLUS Crabgrass preventer down before it starts to germinate. I would have this done within the next 2 weeks to get the most benefit out of applying it.

Can you apply a Crabgrass preventer later than within the next 2 weeks and still have at least some effect? Well, yes you can BUT when you buy something why not get the most out of it?

With some spring broadleaf weeds starting to grow, it’s also time to get these under control. When our temperatures are going to be as low as weather broadcasters are stating, we have to understand what will work and won’t work. Some products we carry are great for cool temperatures but not for high humidity and temperatures over 85 degrees.  (Also, to catch up our past posts on fertilizer and weed control, CLICK HERE.)

So my real TAKE-HOME POINT of writing this post today is that reading and understanding a product label is very important. A few of you have heard me say that just because a product is on a store’s shelf does not mean it needs to be on your yard. Well now you have purchased something from Red Hen’s shelf, so the question becomes, “Is it a good time to put it down?”

Think back to the day that you came in and bought a product. Was the weather different? Was it sunny, raining or cold?

One of my goals everyday is to save my friends, coworkers, clients and family time, money and hopefully both. Read the label and (HERE’s THE KEY) if you do not understand part of the label give us call and hopefully I will save you both.

Take care of yourself and your yard,
Jeremy Cooper

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Red Hen Turf Farm makes DO-IT-YOURSELF LAWN CARE DO-able!  
For timely updates, deals, and more, keep in touch with us by
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Straight from our FAQ VAULT … It’s Spring, but why is my Kentucky Bluegrass Sod not GREEN yet?

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vault-154685_640

Especially for people who sodded their lawns last year, it can be a surprise when the snow comes off and you see your sodded lawn looking very UNGREEN.

While it may be a bit annoying, this is extremely typical.

During the winter months, Kentucky bluegrass sod will go dormant, and needs time, warmth, sunlight, and nutrients to GREEN-UP. In fact, your neighbors’ grass may green up before yours simply as a result of the genetics of the Kentucky bluegrass sod.

The superior genetics of Red Hen’s Kentucky bluegrass sod gives it excellent tolerance of diseases like leaf spot and summer patch. And, as you know, it is a very attractive, dense, compact (low growing) turf with dark green color during the summer.

However, as is the case with certain elite varieties of Kentucky bluegrass, our sod can have a long winter dormancy and slow spring green-up. Cool dry weather can exacerbate this growth response. Full green-up typically occurs by mid- to late-May.

So what can you do besides wait?

An early spring application of fertilizer may very well help speed up the green-up of your Kentucky bluegrass sod. Please note that as of today (March 24th), it’s still a little early to apply fertilizer because the ground is still frozen, but we would expect that applying between April 1 and May 1 will help tremendously.

Another thing you might try is to mow the brown tips off of your grass.  This may help stimulate growth, but it will also make your lawn more aesthetically pleasing in the meantime.

I mentioned earlier that you might notice your neighbors’ lawns greening up quicker than your Kentucky bluegrass sod. This is because their lawns may be comprised of perennial ryegrass and/or some type of fescue, which often green-up several weeks earlier than the elite type of sod you have in your own lawn. Perennial ryegrass typically will have the earliest green-up.

More questions? Give us a call at 574-232-6811.
Thanks!

– Lisa, Red Hen Turf Farm

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Straight from Red Hen’s FAQ Vault … Should I apply Crabgrass Preventer in the Spring? And WHEN?

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CRABGRASS Image Source: Purdue Turf Tips

CRABGRASS
Image Source: Purdue Turf Tips

Hi everyone.
I hope everyone is faring well with the winter we have been dealt with this year.

We’re about 2 weeks away from the official first day of Spring, and this time of year one of the most asked questions asked about fertilizer is when is the best time to apply.

My own recommendation for the Michiana area is usually within a few days of what Purdue forecasts, so here we go…

I know in my yard I have a few spots where the turf has thinned and I know these are areas where crabgrass will take over, so I am going to apply 13-0-5 with Barricade (crabgrass preventer) on my yard on April 18, 2015.

But remember your yard can be different than mine. Just a few variables that you should look for include:

  • Were your sidewalks edged last year exposing the soil?
  • Is your soil compacted next to the sidewalks, drives and decks?
  • Is your turf thin in certain areas?
  • Are you able to regularly irrigate to keep your lawn growing?

If you have any of these problems, I would apply a crabgrass preventer. It is a lot easier to prevent crabgrass before it happens.

If you have any lingering questions feel free to call or email us.

Learn more:

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5 Simple Tips for Avoiding Winter Damage to Your Lawn

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Turfgrass damaged from de-icing salts used during winter.  Photo credit: Kevin Frank, Michigan State University Extension http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/tips_for_reseeding_lawns_in_the_spring

Turfgrass damaged from de-icing salts used during winter. Photo Source: Kevin Frank, Michigan State University Extension

WINTER! It’s the time of year when you spend the least amount of time thinking about your lawn.  But did you realize that your lawn is especially vulnerable to damage in these cold months?

One of the main culprits are de-icers such as rock salt – also known as road salt or sodium chloride (NaCl) – which was first used as a de-icer in the 1940’s. Rock salt is an effective, abundant, and relatively cheap de-icer and is by far the most common de-icing chemical in the United States. In fact, our roads across the county see around 10 million tons of salt per year, not to mention the added tons of salt and other de-icers we apply to our driveways and sidewalks.

While salt de-icers serve a good purpose, excessive salt deposits can translocate to the stems, buds, and roots of trees, shrubs, and landscape plants which causes disfigured foliage, stunted growth and severe decline in health. Salt runoff washes from pavement into the ground, and increases salt levels in the soil, often burning grass.

Other de-icers such as calcium chloride and magnesium chloride can also cause a great deal of damage to your lawn.  The Consumer Reports Ice-Melt Comparison below should give you an idea of the pros and cons of the most commonly used de-icers.

Consumer Reports Online, Ice Melt Comparison

Consumer Reports Online, Ice Melt Comparison (CLICK HERE)

 

Homeowners often do not make the connection about what causes the “mysterious” damage symptoms they see in their lawn come spring.

So how can you avoid winter lawn damage?

Here are 5 simple tips you can follow:

1.  Apply Salt Sparingly – The recommended application rate for sodium chloride or rock salt is one handful per square yard treated. The rate for Calcium chloride is even less salt-one handful for every three square yards treated (an area about the size of a twin bed). You might think that using more salt than this will speed up the melting process, but that is not true.  Sand, light gravel, cinders and cat litter won’t melt ice completely, but can provide some traction and can be used in conjunction with de-icers if you’re looking to use fewer chemicals.

 2.  Read Labels for Spread Rates – Check the label before you buy. For instance, calcium chloride (CaCl2) is slightly more expensive than sodium chloride, but it requires less product, works at lower temperatures and does not contain cyanide, unlike sodium chloride (NaCl, rock salt) which does.

3.  Avoid Using de-icers that Contain Urea – Urea has is also used as a lawn fertilizer due to its very high nitrogen content.  De-icers with urea are marketed for their dual deicing/fertilizing properties.  The idea is that not only will it de-ice your driveway, but when it washes away, urea’s fertilizer properties will boost your lawn growth. Sounds like a good buy, right? Well, not exactly.  Urea is actually a more costly method of deicing, compared to others.  It performs poorly under temperatures of 25°F, and can burn the lawn edges if it lies concentrated for any length of time.   If you are drawn to urea because of its dual deicing/fertilizing purpose, keep in mind that in the spring when the rain and melts come, the soil in your lawn will still be frozen for some time before thawing.  It is likely that the urea will still run off of your lawn and into a storm drain or local waterway. Excess urea in our lakes, rivers, and streams is not a good thing because the nitrogen in the urea can cause a chemical imbalance and endanger the water source’s ecosystem.

4.  Shovel Early and Often – The best method to keep your pavement clear is to remove fresh snow before it has a chance to harden into ice. de-icers work best when there is only a thin layer of snow or ice that needs to be melted, so shovel first, break up any ice patches you can, and then add the salt.

5. Minimize Traffic Across Turf – While not specifically de-icer related, this tip is important because your grass becomes very brittle and cell walls actually crack when they the blades are frozen and then stepped on. While your lawn will usually grow out of this kind of damage in the spring, constant traffic can do irreparable harm. Avoid activities like creating huge heavy piles of snow while shoveling, walking across your lawn to go check the mail, or sleigh riding on a fine lawn, even in deep snow. Pet traffic should also be minimized if possible.  All of these types of activities can cause brown areas to appear in early spring.

 

LEARN MORE:
Salt Damage in Landscape Plants via Purdue Extension

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